Mona Sandbęk: The implementation of children's rights; challenges for future work. Pieter Vanhuysse: Are Mature Welfare States on the Path to the Politics of Gerontocracy? Evidence from 18 OECD Democracies, 1980-2002.
 


Thursday 8 May 2008, 10:00 a.m.
Seminar Room at the European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Berggasse 17, 1090 Vienna

Contact: Orsolya Lelkes

The implementation of children's rights; challenges for future work?

Speaker: Mona Sandbęk, NOVA, Oslo, CV

Highlights of the Seminar
The Council of Europe has worked extensively for several decades on the issue of promoting children's rights and banning corporal punishment. The organisation's work sheds light on the relationship between international conventions and national and local policies. While the landmark judgements of the Court of Human Rights are well-known, other important aspects of the organisation's work have reached academic society only to a limited degree. In my presentation I would not only highlight the Council of Europe's efforts to operationalise children's rights and put them into practice in everyday life, but also discuss some dilemmas in the three-way relationship between the child, the state and the family that accompany the implementation of children's rights. Emphasis will be put on challenges for future work.

and

Are Mature Welfare States on the Path to the Politics of Gerontocracy? Evidence from 18 OECD Democracies, 1980-2002?

Speaker: Pieter Vanhuysse, University of Haifa and European Centre, CV

Highlights of the Seminar
In the fifteen years since 1990, the average OECD median voter age has increased three times faster than in the preceding thirty years. This paper uses recent panel data covering the years 1980-2002 to investigate the effects of population ageing on both the size and the generosity of public pension spending in 18 OECD countries. Results indicate that population ageing has two opposite effects. It increases overall pension spending as a percentage of GDP but decreases the relative generosity of individual pension benefits. The effects of political-economic, partisan and institutional variables further indicate that contemporary pension politics has more fully adopted a retrenchment logic since the early 1990s. But contrary to recent political economy predictions, the rapidly ageing OECD democracies are not yet on the path to a new distributive politics of elderly power, or gerontocracy.

International Seminar series
The seminar was part of the series of international seminars that are organised by the European Centre. More information about our other International Seminars


Downloads
Presentation Mona Sandbęk
pdf, 3 KB, 111585

Presentation Pieter Vanhuysse
pdf, 3 KB, 3378841